Civil War Era

Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated

Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated
Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated

Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated

Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case! Very nice set of Gold epaulets from the Civil War Era.

This set has beautiful gold foil work and detailing as shown on the top of each piece. The cloth straps are intact.

Measures 6 x 5 inches. Box measures 9 L x 4 H x 6 W inches The Curator of the West Point Museum has authenticated the pieces as original. Would make a great gift for an Army officer or student of military history or new military cadet. Guaranteed Original Truly fantastic pieces of history.

A must for the SERIOUS Collector of Army memorabilia. Epaulette is a type of ornamental shoulder piece or decoration used as insignia of rank by armed forces and other organizations. In the French and other armies, epaulettes are also worn by all ranks of elite or ceremonial units when on parade.

It may bear rank or other insignia, and should not be confused with a shoulder mark - also called a shoulder board, rank slide, or slip-on - a flat cloth sleeve worn on the shoulder strap of a uniform (although the two terms are often used interchangeably). Epaulettes are fastened to the shoulder by a shoulder strap or passenten, a small strap parallel to the shoulder seam, and the button near the collar, or by laces on the underside of the epaulette passing through holes in the shoulder of the coat.

Colloquially, any shoulder straps with marks are also called epaulettes. The placement of the epaulette, its color and the length and diameter of its bullion fringe are used to signify the wearer's rank.

At the join of the fringe and the shoulderpiece is often a metal piece in the form of a crescent. Although originally worn in the field, epaulettes are now normally limited to dress or ceremonial military uniforms.

Epaulettes bear some resemblance to the shoulder pteruges of ancient Roman military costumes. However, their direct origin lies in the bunches of ribbons worn on the shoulders of military coats at the end of the 17th century, which were partially decorative and partially intended to prevent shoulder belts from slipping. These ribbons were tied into a knot that left the fringed end free.

This established the basic design of the epaulette as it evolved through the 18th and 19th centuries. From the 18th century on, epaulettes were used in the American, French and other armies to indicate rank. The rank of an officer could be determined by whether an epaulette was worn on the left shoulder, the right shoulder, or on both. Later a "counter-epaulette" (with no fringe) was worn on the opposite shoulder of those who wore only a single epaulette. Epaulettes were made in silver or gold for officers and in cloth of various colors for the enlisted men of various arms.

Certain categories of cavalry wore flexible metal epaulettes referred to as shoulder scales, rarely worn on the field. Brief History of American Civil War. The Civil War is the central event in America's historical consciousness. The war resolved two fundamental questions left unresolved by the revolution: whether the United States was to be a dissolvable confederation of sovereign states or an indivisible nation with a sovereign national government; and whether this nation, born of a declaration that all men were created with an equal right to liberty, would continue to exist as the largest slaveholding country in the world. Northern victory in the war preserved the United States as one nation and ended the institution of slavery that had divided the country from its beginning.

But these achievements came at the cost of 625,000 lives--nearly as many American soldiers as died in all the other wars in which this country has fought combined. The American Civil War was the largest and most destructive conflict in the Western world between the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 and the onset of World War I in 1914.

The Civil War started because of uncompromising differences between the free and slave states over the power of the national government to prohibit slavery in the territories that had not yet become states. When Abraham Lincoln won election in 1860 as the first Republican president on a platform pledging to keep slavery out of the territories, seven slave states in the deep South seceded and formed a new nation, the Confederate States of America. The incoming Lincoln administration and most of the Northern people refused to recognize the legitimacy of secession. They feared that it would discredit democracy and create a fatal precedent that would eventually fragment the no-longer United States into several small, squabbling countries. The event that triggered war came at Fort Sumter in Charleston Bay on April 12, 1861. Claiming this United States fort as their own, the Confederate army on that day opened fire on the federal garrison and forced it to lower the American flag in surrender. Lincoln called out the militia to suppress this insurrection.

Four more slave states seceded and joined the Confederacy. By the end of 1861 nearly a million armed men confronted each other along a line stretching 1200 miles from Virginia to Missouri.

Several battles had already taken place--near Manassas Junction in Virginia, in the mountains of western Virginia where Union victories paved the way for creation of the new state of West Virginia, at Wilson's Creek in Missouri, at Cape Hatteras in North Carolina, and at Port Royal in South Carolina where the Union navy established a base for a blockade to shut off the Confederacy's access to the outside world. But the real fighting began in 1862. Huge battles like Shiloh in Tennessee, Gaines' Mill, Second Manassas, and Fredericksburg in Virginia, and Antietam in Maryland foreshadowed even bigger campaigns and battles in subsequent years, from Gettysburg in Pennsylvania to Vicksburg on the Mississippi to Chickamauga and Atlanta in Georgia.

By 1864 the original Northern goal of a limited war to restore the Union had given way to a new strategy of "total war" to destroy the Old South and its basic institution of slavery and to give the restored Union a "new birth of freedom, " as President Lincoln put it in his address at Gettysburg to dedicate a cemetery for Union soldiers killed in the battle there. For three long years, from 1862 to 1865, Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia staved off invasions and attacks by the Union Army of the Potomac commanded by a series of ineffective generals until Ulysses S. Grant came to Virginia from the Western theater to become general in chief of all Union armies in 1864.

After bloody battles at places with names like The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg, Grant finally brought Lee to bay at Appomattox in April 1865. In the meantime Union armies and river fleets in the theater of war comprising the slave states west of the Appalachian Mountain chain won a long series of victories over Confederate armies commanded by hapless or unlucky Confederate generals.

By the spring of 1865 all the principal Confederate armies surrendered, and when Union cavalry captured the fleeing Confederate President Jefferson Davis in Georgia on May 10, 1865, resistance collapsed and the war ended. The long, painful process of rebuilding a united nation free of slavery began. The item "Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated" is in sale since Sunday, April 19, 2020. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Militaria\Civil War (1861-65)\Original Period Items\Other Civil War Original Items". The seller is "pa-history-coll" and is located in New York, New York.

This item can be shipped to United States.
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Beautiful Set of Civil War Era epaulettes with original case Authenticated